Tag Archives: Nescent

$2.18 million NSF grant awarded to Dryad

May, 2009

The National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent) and the Metadata Research Center (MRC) have been developing Dryad in coordination with a large group of journals and societies in evolutionary biology and ecology. With the new grant, the additional team members are contributing to the development of the repository. (More information about the award can be found here.)

CRADLE Seminar: Celebrating Darwin Day — Metadata Research and the Dryad Repository Project

February, 2009

Presented by: Jane Greenberg and Hollie White
208 Manning Hall
12 noon, Friday, Feb 13th

The Dryad repository is for scientific data supporting published research in the field of evolutionary biology and related disciplines. Dryad was launched via a collaboration between the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent), an NSF Center supporting research in evolutionary biology, and the Metadata Research Center (MRC) at the School of Information and Library Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Dryad seeks to balance a need for low barriers inviting contribution from scientists and higher-level goals supporting data analysis activities. The Dryad development team has pursued an active metadata research agenda. This CRADLE talk will introduce the Dryad repository, provide an overview of current metadata research activities, and highlight several research accomplishments.

Dr. Jim Balhoff visits School of Information and Library Science

November, 2008

On Monday, November 3, 2008, Dr. Jim Balhoff, a research programmer at NESCent (the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center) visited Jane Greenberg’s Metadata class to discuss ontologies and the NCBO BioPortal.

Two repository development positions available

November, 2008

The Dryad Data Repository has two open programming positions located in central North Carolina: (1) a general repository programmer and (2) a programmer focused on enhancing metadata records with controlled vocabulary terms. Dryad stores data underlying scientific publications from evolutionary biology and related fields. Dryad is being developed by the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent) and the Metadata Research Center (MRC) at the University of North Carolina in coordination with several scientific journals and societies.

(1) The Dryad Repository Programmer will support general repository development activities, enhancing systems for preserving, searching, and distributing scientific data. This position is funded for 3 years, with possibility for extension. It will be located at NESCent in Durham, NC, and information about applying can be found on the NESCent site.

(2) The Dryad/HIVE Programmer will apply the SKOS standard to improve the Dryad cataloging system, developing software to select and manage terms from multiple controlled vocabularies and ontologies. The position (number: 0058793) is funded for 21 months, with possibility for extension. It will be located at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Apply now through the UNC Chapel Hill Office of Human Resources. The position will close on December 10, 2008.

Please see the NESCent site for full position descriptions.

Dryad Project Receives Funding from the NSF

September, 2008

A Digital Repository for Preservation and Sharing of Data Underlying Published Works in Evolutionary Biology. Dryad, a collaboration between the MRC and the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent), is awarded $650999.

Workshop sponsored by NESCent and the Metadata Research Center

May 2007

“Digital data preservation, sharing, and discovery: Challenges for Small Science Communities in the Digital Era”

A DRIADE project workshop to help identify the way forward for long-term preservation and sharing for the datasets that underly published works in evolutionary biology.

Digital Repository of Information and Data for Evolution (DRIADE)

November, 2006

A joint project of NESCent and the UNC Metadata Research Center “to establish a repository for heterogeneous digital datasets in the field of evolutionary biology in order to ensure long-term preservation and promote resource discovery and reuse.”